Paradoris liturata

(Bergh, 1905)

Paradoris liturata
Photographed by: Indra Swari

Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Mollusca
Class:Gastropoda
Subclass:Opisthobranchia
Order:Nudibranchia
Suborder:Doridina
Family:Discodorididae
Species:Paradoris liturata

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #12007
Note the bundle of dorsal gills toward the rear end.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #11061
An excellent photo clearly showing the dorsal gills.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #10156
Note the mid-dorsal gills.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #10924
Two individuals mating. Both individuals have their gills retracted, so the mimicry with Phyllidiella pustulosa is almost perfect.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #9822
This individual has its gills extended. Apart from those gills, this species is a perfect mimic for Phyllidiella pustulosa.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #6254
An individual crawling with its gill circlet withdrawn creating an almost exact mimic of Phyllidiella pustulosa.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #739
A member of the family Discodorididae that mimics Phyllidiella pustulosa (Phyllidiidae). This is a good photo to portray and ‘expose’ this species because the gills are clearly visible, but when they are retracted the resemblance is perfect. In contrast, Aldisa williamsi (family Dorididae), which is probably also part of this mimicry complex, has a greenish background with large black areas, its rhinophores are pale yellow, and its gills are black.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #3814
This dorid is a marvellous mimic of Phyllidiella pustulosa.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #1580
This is a very interesting and special dorid nudibranch that mimics Phyllidiella pustulosa. The gills are dorsal in Paradoris liturata, but they are retracted into the branchial pocket below the mantle surface in this individual so they are not visible.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #1169
Note the gill pocket towards the hind end on the left hand side of this animal. A dorid that mimics species of Phyllidiella.

Comment from Richard Willan on photo #1151
Though this is an interesting photo taken head on, it makes identification difficult because the rear end of the body is not visible. I suspect it is not a phyllidiid as it appears at first glance, but the discodorid that mimics pink phyllidiid nudibranchs (like Phyllidiella pustulosa), and so it would have a set of dorsal gills at the rear of the body.

Locality:

 

Pictures of Paradoris liturata

Paradoris liturata from Lembeh, Indonesia
Posted 8 years ago
Viewed 737 times
Paradoris liturata from Lembeh, IndonesiaIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Posted 8 years ago
Viewed 679 times
Paradoris liturata from Lembeh, Indonesia
Posted 8 years ago
Viewed 537 times
Paradoris liturata from Lembeh, IndonesiaIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Posted 10 years ago
Viewed 2198 times
Paradoris liturata from Lembeh, IndonesiaIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Posted 9 years ago
Viewed 2509 times
Paradoris liturata from Lembeh, IndonesiaIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Posted 10 years ago
Viewed 2027 times
Paradoris liturata from Davao, PhilippinesIdentification reviewed by Dave Behrens
Posted 8 years ago
Viewed 903 times
Paradoris liturata from Anilao, PhilippinesIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Posted 10 years ago
Viewed 2165 times
Paradoris liturata from Marsa Alam, EgyptIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Posted 8 years ago
Viewed 777 times
Paradoris liturata from Alor, Indonesia
Location: Alor, Indonesia
Posted 8 years ago
Viewed 570 times
Paradoris cf. liturata from Watamu, KenyaIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
Location: Watamu, Kenya
Posted 7 years ago
Viewed 677 times
Paradoris liturata from Rinca Island, Indonesia
Posted 7 years ago
Viewed 474 times
 
 

Similar Species

Author: Dr. Bill Rudman

Quoted from Sea Slug Forum: The example I illustrate here are the phyllidiid dorid nudibranchs such as Phyllidiella pustulosa. The phyllidiids exude very noxious and toxic chemicals from their skin and appear to be avoided by most fish. They are often the only sea slugs which blatantly crawl out in the open during the day. Other nudibranchs, flatworms, and even a holothurian are known to mimic phyllidiid nudibranchs.

Aldisa williamsi from Komodo, IndonesiaIdentification reviewed by Richard Willan
(5 photos)
 
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